Using reef fish movement to inform marine reserve design

JOURNAL OF APPLIED ECOLOGY
2017
Weeks, Rebecca; Green, Alison L.; Joseph, Eugene; Peterson, Nate; Terk, Elizabeth
Publisher N/A
SourceWeb of Science
Volume / Issue54 / 1
Pages145 - 152
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ISBN N/A
DOI10.1111/1365-2664.12736
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Conference Date N/A
Publication Date17-Feb
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AbstractA central tenet of protected area design is that conserva-tion areas must be adequate to ensure the persistence ofthe features that they aim to conserve. These featuresmight include species, populations, communities and/orenvironmental processes. Protected area adequacy entailsboth good design (e.g. size, conÞguration, replication) andmanagement effectiveness (e.g. level of protection, compli-ance with regulations). With respect to design, guidelinesrecommend that protected area size be informed by spe-ciesÕ home ranges, as individuals that move beyond pro-tected area boundaries are exposed to threats and arethus only partially protected (Kramer & Chapman 1999).This is especially important for species that are directlyexploited, as are many coral reef-associated Þshes.Information on movement patterns of coral reef Þsheshas only recently been summarized in the literature, alongwith guidelines on how this information might be used toinform the adequate design of marine protected areas(MPAs; Green et al. 2015). Here, we demonstrate, usingan example from Micronesia, how these guidelines can beadapted and applied within a particular socio-ecologicalcontext to guide discussions with stakeholders aimed atimproving the efÞcacy of an existing protected area net-work. We discuss aspects of this process that were suc-cessful and those that were challenging, and in so doing,identify areas where future ecological research effortmight beneÞt protected area planning and design.
Created: 12/14/2017 10:31 AM (ET)
Modified: 12/14/2017 10:31 AM (ET)
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